ATLANTA CEMETERY TOUR
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
1. Entrance, Sandy Springs Methodist Church Cemetery, Sandy Springs, GA,
11-23-06
3. Graves, Sandy Springs United Methodist Church Cemetery, Sandy Springs,
GA, 11-23-06
7. Crossroads Primitive Baptist Church, Sandy Springs, GA, 11-23-06
6. Bordered, gravel-covered family plots, Sandy Springs United Methodist
Church Cemetery, Sandy Springs, GA, 11-23-06
8. Bordered graves dressed with gravel and AstroTurf, Crossroads Primitive
Baptist Church Cemetery, Sandy Springs, GA, 11-22-06
5. Yucca by child’s grave, Sandy Springs United Methodist Church Cemetery,
Sandy Springs, GA, 11-23-06
4. Graves mounded with concrete, Sandy Springs United Methodist Church
Cemetery, Sandy Springs, GA, 11-23-06
2. Panorama, Sandy Springs United Methodist Church Cemetery, Sandy
Springs, GA, 11-23-06
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour
But the cemetery-visiting impulse had not subsided, so we visited three cemeteries in Sandy Springs, GA, a
northern suburb of Atlanta.  Two of them are old cemeteries, dating from well back into the 19th century, that have
After our travels documenting Alabama cemeteries, we arrived in Atlanta for Thanksgiving with family and friends.  
now been enveloped by the Atlanta metropolitan area.  Crossroads Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery is a modest
and attractive cemetery with one grave revealing a homemade concrete cover embedded with cockles.  Sandy
After our travels documenting Alabama cemeteries, we arrived in Atlanta for Thanksgiving with family and friends.  
Springs United Methodist Church Cemetery yielded up a variety of old crypt-like structures and grave covers and
proved an interesting cemetery in many ways.

The third cemetery we visited is a contemporary private cemetery, Arlington Memorial Park, where we became
fascinated with the use of stones as tokens on graves in the Jewish section of the cemetery.  Stone tokens laid on
practice may have coalesced with another tradition of bringing back rocks from Israel.  A number of graves had
both plain rocks and painted rocks sometimes inscribed with messages.  The Jewish section has official signs
encouraging the use of rocks painted by Jewish children, which are placed in bowls at helpful locations.  A similar
official encouragement for placing American flags by graves of veterans is reflected in a sign at the entrance to the
cemetery.  In both cases a folk practice has been formally adopted and elaborated by the cemetery’s management
to encourage people to develop interactive relationships with the cemetery.

Alan Jabbour
December 2006
For more photos from Atlanta cemeteries, Click here.
10. Detail of cockles, Crossroads Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery,
Sandy Springs, GA, 11-23-06
Photo by Karen Singer Jabbour